Students on Chauvin

 

Perhaps there is some hope that enough students are getting an education and learning to think critically rather being fed crap. Here are three students.

Liberals and Democrats expressed relief at the verdict, while many conservatives criticized it. Many on both sides seemed to believe they knew the “right verdict” in advance, and then reacted to the jury’s decision accordingly. Few showed any inclination to trust the jury’s deliberation and judgment on their own terms. Since judicial bodies are designed to be authoritative sources, this is highly concerning. If Americans no longer hold any special reverence for institutions of jury and court, the legitimacy of the entire legal system is at risk.—Thomas Brodey, Amherst College, history

Even in the U.S., the rule of law is challenged by the desires of the mob. . . . In Book Eight of “The Spirit of the Laws,” Montesquieu warns that when the people “fall into a spirit of extreme equality,” they “want to manage everything themselves, to debate for the senate, to execute for the magistrate, and to decide for the judges.” . . . After the trial, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez warned against viewing it as an example of the system working, because it doesn’t and it needs to be torn asunder. But all is not lost. The Constitution establishes appellate jurisdiction and due process. With a renewed commitment from the people, these achievements can be secured.

—Micah Veillon, Georgia Institute of Technology, history, technology and society

(Betting AOC has never heard of Montesquieu)

The 1963 Birmingham Children’s Crusade had Americans glued to their televisions, witnessing the mercilessness of police commissioner Eugene “Bull” Connor. . . . In 2020 the world watched Derek Chauvin murder George Floyd. Alongside three other police officers, Mr. Chauvin pinned Floyd face down, knee on his neck, neglecting to administer aid as Floyd pleaded for his life.

In both cases, the crimes were so inhumane and the evidence so damning, America had to pay attention. . . . America rejoiced when Mr. Chauvin was found guilty on all three charges.

Diana D’Souza, Dartmouth College, government and economics

Big Brother

The Biden administration is considering using private firms to track the online activity of American citizens in order to get around the Fourth Amendment and other laws that protect Americans from unreasonable searches and seizures and surveillance. The report says that the Biden administration wants to monitor “extremist chatter by Americans online” but can’t do so without a warrant, and thinks private firms can get around the legal restrictions.

 

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